Cerebral Palsy and Health Insurance.
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy

Cerebral Palsy and InsuranceCerebral PalsyCerebral PalsyCerebral PalsyCerebral Palsy

Paying for the necessary medical costs of cerebral palsy can be a daunting task, but there are other funding sources that can be utilized. Health insurance that is provided by individual or group funds, such as through an employer, is called private health insurance, and differs from health insurance such as Medicare, which is publicly funded insurance provided by the government.

Cerebral Palsy

Cerebral Palsy

Usually, if a child’s health care costs are covered through a private insurance agency, the coverage comes from a parent’s group coverage, included in his or her employment benefits. Such group coverage private insurance is most often a fee-for-service plan, in which the insurance pays for a service after it has been delivered.  These types of group insurance plans provided through an employer are usually the most generous, although benefits obviously differ from job to job. Plans that are obtained on an individual basis are generally far more restrictive, containing limitations on covered services and frequently denying coverage for preexisting conditions. For this reason, if you purchase private health insurance individually, it is possible that your child’s cerebral palsy costs will not be covered if it considered a preexisting condition.

 An additional well-known type of private health insurance is the Health Maintenance Organization (HMO), which were created as a means to deal with the rising costs of healthcare. Not surprisingly, their primary goal is to keep the cost of healthcare low, also called cost containment. HMO’s are generally administered through a primary care physician who refers patients to other health care specialists when necessary. Many HMO policies include particular physicians within the network of the policy, and patients are only fully covered if those physicians treat them. Because private health insurance plans vary on such a grand scale, you must be sure to closely scrutinize the details of an insurance policy before you accept it – if you assume anything about your coverage, you may end up having to pay a balance much larger than what your family’s budget can bear.

 When deciding which policy is right for your family, make sure to pay close attention to the limits on out-of-pocket liability, co-insurance maximum benefit levels, and deductible clauses. The out-of-pocket liability, also known as the “stop-loss clause,” is the cutoff point the insurance company establishes on a family’s out-of-pocket expenses for a given calendar year before the insurance company pays the full balance of further covered charges. Co-insurance is the portion of expenses that must be paid by the family after the deductible has been met, and the deductible is the amount of money a family must pay before the insurance company will pay anything.  

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