Associated Conditions of Cerebral Palsy: Hearing, Depression, Breathing Problems,
Drooling, ADHD, ADD, Bowel issues, Swallowing, Epilepsy, Speech Problems.
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy Introduction
Cerebral Palsy is a collection of motor disorders or dysfunctions that occur as a result of damage to the brain before, at or during birth. It is not a progressive disorder but a static one meaning that the condition will not get worse over time. A child with Cerebral Palsy may have: poor coordination; irregular or abnormal movement patterns; difficulty with balance; very tense muscles or muscles that have very little tone and make the child “floppy”; or a combination of these motor disorders. Different parts of the body can be affected in different ways and each individual with Cerebral Palsy will have their own unique combination including: type of dysfunction and level of severity.

Cerebral Palsy

Cerebral Palsy


The forms of cerebral palsy are generally classified as spastic, athetoid, ataxic, or a mixture of these. While it is a condition that affects movement, posture and coordination, there can be associated conditions which are more likely to occur in children who have cerebral palsy.

Most of the complications of Cerebral Palsy are neurological. In light of the fact that the part of the brain affected controls muscles which in turn move bones, children with Cerebral Palsy often have orthopedic problems as well.

The purpose in this site is to offer information on some of the conditions and complications that occur more frequently in individuals with Cerebral Palsy. Every child is different and may or may not have any of the complications noted here.

• Between 35% and 50% of children with Cerebral Palsy develop epilepsy or seizure disorder.

• Many children with Cerebral Palsy will have some form of mental retardation. Children with the most severe forms of motor dysfunction are most likely to also experience mental retardation.

• Children with Cerebral Palsy may have difficulty with a sleeping disorder.

• Cerebral Palsy can affect children’s speech and/or chewing and swallowing due to lack of coordination of the muscles involved. The inability to swallow can also lead to poor nutrition and poor growth, sometimes referred to as failure to thrive

• Learning disabilities can hamper an individual with Cerebral Palsy. They can have difficulty processing information about shapes, speed and space – this is often referred to as a visual or spatial perception difficulty. Others may have other types of impariments which can lead to difficulties with specific activities such as reading, drawing or mathematics.

For more in depth information on possible conditions associated with Cerebral Palsy, please refer to the topics on the left.

Read more cerebral palsy information:
Travel Source
Surgical Intervention
Depression
Drooling and Swallowing Problems
Genetic Disorders
Cerebral Palsy and Special Education

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Associated Conditions of Cerebral Palsy: Hearing, Depression, Breathing Problems,
Drooling, ADHD, ADD, Bowel issues, Swallowing, Epilepsy, Speech Problems.