Cerebral Palsy equipment and accessories including wheelchairs, scooters,
standers, walkers, computers, seating, car seats, braces and dogs.
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy

Standers & ScootersCerebral PalsyCerebral Palsy

Standers

A stander, as the name suggests, is a device to help a child stand. At a certain age (often before the age of one year) it’s necessary to start a child standing even when he or she does not have adequate head or upper body control to stand alone. Standing is important because it allows the child to do some weight bearing through the legs, which in-turn makes the bones stronger and stimulates the development of motor coordination and head control.

Cerebral Palsy

Cerebral Palsy

Standing also allows the child to adopt a position different from sitting or lying, and many children interact better with their environment when they are standing up. Standing is strongly encouraged for all children, regardless of how seriously affected they are. The benefits are present in may ways in many areas, from improving bone size and strength, to posture, breathing, and bowel function.

Each of the different types of stander: prone stander, supine stander, Freedom stander, Parapodium standing frame, is used in a specific situation. The one most commonly used for children with cerebral palsy is the prone stander. The prone stander has support in front of the child that comes up to the top of the chest just under the neck, and the child leans forward. Often a tray is attached at the front of the stander, and the child can put his or her arms out and play with the toys atop the tray. The angle (in relation to straight or perpendicular) on most prone standers can be adjusted to allow for the proper angle given the strength and balance of the child. The child that does best in the prone stander has at least partial head control, but need not have excellent upper body control, as the prone stander will help him or her to develop it.

Supported standing can be helpful to children and adults of all ages, whether they are ambulatory or not. People who do not stand on their own can get a much needed psychological boost when 'standing' alongside their peers in the classroom. Most users, both non-ambulatory and ambulatory, can use standers to stretch tight

Walkers

A walker is a device with a frame that is inherently stable, so when it is left to stand alone it will not fall over. There are a number of different types of walker. Unlike the walker most frequently used by the elderly (made of aluminum with four sturdy posts, front or rear wheels, and is pushed in front of him or her while walking), the rear or Kay posture walker has become most popular for children with cerebral palsy. Its appearance is similar, but the frame goes around the back and is open in the front. This discourages the child from leaning forward and encourages him or her to stand up straighter.

Walkers come in sized to fit toddlers on up. Some come with a flip down seat so that if the individual doing the walking becomes fatigued, they can sit down and take a rest.  Models come with either 2 (front) or four wheels. On some models, the back wheels are only able to move in a forward direction so there is no risk that the child will have the walker roll backwards away from her if she pushes her weight in that direction. There are also models that have heavy duty wheels for a more all-terrain outdoor walking assist.

Closely linked to walkers are gait trainers. These devices are more frequently used when a child needs practice coordinating all the movements that go into walking and the proper body positioning for walking. Due to a number of factors, a child's feet, knees and or hips may rotate in such a way that they find themselves literally tripping over their own feet. A gait trainer in coordination with bracing or AFO's if deemed appropriate can help a child gain the strength and coordination they need to achieve more mobility and independence.

http://www.blvd.com/Wheelchairs_and_Accessories/Standing_Frames_and_Wheelchairs/

http://www.1800wheelchair.com/asp/view-category-products.asp?category_id=458

http://www.vasi.on.ca/orthotic/orthotic.htm

http://www.altimatemedical.com/products.cfm

http://www.mulhollandinc.com/Products.asp

http://www.tumbleforms.com/bergeron/standers.html

http://www.jenniecompany.com/equipment.htm

http://www.sammonspreston.com/Pediatrics/

http://www.kayeproducts.com/wb01.html

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Cerebral Palsy equipment and accessories including wheelchairs, scooters,
standers, walkers, computers, seating, car seats, braces and dogs.