Cerebral Palsy and DDA & Bill of Rights Act.
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy

Cerebral Palsy, DDA and the Bill of Rights ActCerebral PalsyCerebral PalsyCerebral Palsy

Up until 1975, people with developmental disabilities had few legal rights that explicitly applied to them. The Developmental Disabilities Services and Facilities Construction Amendments of 1970 represents the first congressional endeavor to address the needs of a group of people with developmental disabilities. Also in 1970, Congress amended the Mental Retardation Facilities and Community Health Centers Construction Act of 1963, as well as legally defining “developmentally disabled” to include people with mental retardation, cerebral palsy, epilepsy, and other neurological conditions closely related to mental retardation which originate prior to age 18 and constitute a significant handicap.

Cerebral Palsy

Cerebral Palsy

In 1975, Congress approved the Developmentally Disabled Assistance and Bill of Rights Act, which required that protection and advocacy programs be created in each state as a stipulation to collect a state grant. The protection and advocacy systems (P&A systems) are designed to protect and advocate the rights of people with developmental disabilities and to pursue legal, administrative, and other solutions to ensure the protection of rights for such people. Congress also added the “Rights of the Developmentally Disabled” in 1975, which included congressional findings such as the right to appropriate treatment and services designed to make the most of individual potential, as well as expanding the definition of “developmentally disabled” to incorporate autism and dyslexia, if said dyslexia was the result of one of the other disabilities included in the definition.

 

One of the most fundamental effects the Developmentally Disabled Assistance and Bill of Rights Act had on the lives of developmentally disabled persons was the creation of P&A state programs. The P&A System advocates for the civil and legal rights of people with developmental disabilities. P&A Offices have been leaders in representing institutionalized people who seek to improve their living conditions or reenter the community. P&A offices may also be able to represent persons who cannot afford a lawyer for an IDEA due process hearing or a discrimination suit. Because some people with cerebral palsy may not be able to protect or enforce their own rights, state P&A systems extend vital protection. Contact the National Association of Protection and Advocacy Systems (NAPAS) for the location of your state’s P&A office.

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Cerebral Palsy and Jobs, Estate Planning, Health Insurance,
Letters of Medical Necessity, IDEA, DDA & Bill of Rights Act,
Americans with Disabilites Act, Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and Vocational Rehab.