Associated Conditions of Cerebral Palsy: Physical Debilitation
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy Physical Debilitations
Since Cerebral Palsy is a condition in which there has been damage to the motor centers of the brain, children who have cerebral palsy often have various muscle and skeletal problems. As a young child, they may have a period of low muscle tone (hypotonia). This occurs before other problems in muscle tone and movement become apparent.

Children with the spastic form of Cerebral Palsy are especially at risk to develop contractures which are an abnormal shortening of a muscles resulting in distortion or deformity in the adjoining area. The child’s muscles, which are often tightly flexed, do not grow at the same rate as other muscles. Over time, the muscle in relation to the length of the bone gets tighter and tighter causing more and more restriction of movement.

Cerebral Palsy

Cerebral Palsy


Depending of the joints involved, there are a variety of techniques including: proper body positioning and sitting posture; bracing and surgical remedies which can be used to help the individual gain as much mobility, control and range of motion as possible. the bone gets tighter and tighter causing more and more restriction of movement. Depending of the joints involved, there are a variety of techniques including: proper body positioning and sitting posture; bracing and surgical remedies which can be used to help the individual gain as much mobility, control and range of motion as possible.

Extreme tightness in the groin and hips can often lead to hip dislocation in children with Cerebral Palsy. Hip dislocation in children with spastic cerebral palsy is common with the occurrence being directly related to the severity of the spasticity. This dislocation can lead to significant pain if the dislocation is left untreated. In addition to pain the dislocated hip may cause difficulties with the individual's sitting ability and perineal hygiene; and it may contribute to the formation of pelvic obliquity and skin breakdown.

The imbalance of muscle tone and strength can result in other skeletal problems such as scoliosis (an abnormal sideways curvature of the spine). In young children who have poor control of their trunk muscles, their spines may alternate curving to the left or right. As they get stronger they may achieve more trunk balance.

If the involvement of the muscles is of the quadriplegic type and they are confined to a wheelchair, as they get older, the spinal curve will likely stiffen and become permanent. If not treated, as the severity of the curve increases, it ultimately leads to respiratory and cardiac problems and the individual will no longer be able to sit or lie flat on their back.

There are surgeries that can be performed on the spine so that it is straightened. After surgery, those children and adults with less impairment as a result of their CP, may walk standing straight (if possible) and regain proper sitting posture.

Children with cerebral palsy have a high incidence of scoliosis that often becomes severe. Some children can be treated with bracing, but many will benefit from surgery.

Children with cerebral palsy have a high incidence of scoliosis which often becomes severe. This can lead to sitting balance problems for children who are wheelchair dependent, and ultimately to respiratory and cardiac problems. Some children can be treated with bracing, but many will benefit from surgery.

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Associated Conditions of Cerebral Palsy: Hearing, Depression, Breathing Problems,
Drooling, ADHD, ADD, Bowel issues, Swallowing, Epilepsy, Speech Problems.