Associated Conditions of Cerebral Palsy: Bowel and Urinary Issues
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy Bowel and Urinary Issues
Children with cerebral palsy can have a variety of bowel and bladder related conditions.
Among the prevelant are incontinence urinary tract infections and constipation.

Seizures may cause the loss of bladder and bowel control, though in this case the cause is not cerebral palsy itself but rather the seizure.

Cerebral Palsy

Cerebral Palsy


Incontinence
Incontinence is the inability to prevent the accidental evacuation of feces or urine. There are six primary steps involved with learning to control one's bladder functions: 1) an awareness of the bladder when it contracts, 2) the ability to feel when the bladder is full and plan ahead to make a trip to the bathroom, 3) the ability to control and postpone the emptying reflex until the time is right, 4) the ability to be aware when the bladder is completely empty, 5) the ability to voluntarily hold urine even when the bladder is full by contracting the muscles of the pelvic floor, and 6) the ability to inhibit emptying of the bladder during sleep. Children who are developmentally delayed (another associated condition of cerebral palsy) can take longer to toilet train than other children.

Incontinence may also be caused by a physical problem with the nerves going to the bladder, which can cause urine to leak out slowly. This specific nerve problem is an uncommon condition and is much more likely to occur in children with spina bifida.

Urinary Tract Infections
For children with CP, the primary contributor to urinary tract infections is a condition called vesicoureteral reflux. A big term that just means that when the bladder attempts to empty, some of the urine gets pushed back up towards the kidneys rather than leaving the body which can cause kidney damage. The bladder can also not empty completely leaving urine the body where bacteria can multiply causing an infection. These problems are most prevalent in individuals for whom their brain damage has led to poor bladder functioning.

Constipation
Constipation is a common problem with any child, but children with cerebral palsy who are confined to bed or whose bodies get little are more likely to suffer this problem. Constipation can also be due to an insufficient intake of fluids. Soiling can occur when there is a blockage or impaction. The large mass of dry stool is difficult to pass and liquid feces escapes around the blockage.

If a child with CP has normal cognitive function in having difficulty with toilet training and has no physiological reason for having a problem, other factors should be considered. The child with CP may experience fear when using the toilet if they are insecure and are unsure of the toilet. Will they fall in? Might they fall off the toilet and hurt themselves? Cerebral Palsy, by itself is very rarely the cause of a failure in toilet training or the ability to be continent.

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Associated Conditions of Cerebral Palsy: Hearing, Depression, Breathing Problems,
Drooling, ADHD, ADD, Bowel issues, Swallowing, Epilepsy, Speech Problems.