Forms of Cerebral Palsy: Monoplegia
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Monoplegia

A child with the involvement of only one limb in is said to have the Monoplegic form of Cerebral Palsy It is a rare form of the condition and is commonly thought of as Hemiplegia with extremely mild involvement of the other limb on the affected side of the body. The difficulties are caused by trauma to the brain and should not be confused with disabilities caused by a nerve injury such as those in brachial plexus palsy.

Cerebral Palsy

Cerebral Palsy
If the motor dysfunction in in the arm as is generally the case in hemiplegia, then the child should be given toys, playthings and other manipulatives that encourage and/or prompt the child into two-handed exploration. Stimulating the use of the affected hand can lead to a degree of improvement.

Even though only one limb is affected, it is always a good idea to work with your physicians and therapists to set realistic goals for the child. Since hemiplegic-type involvement is most severe at the end of the limb and the arm is more often afftected than the leg, a child may never achieve the use of their hand and fingers like a child without Cerebral Palsy.


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Forms of Cerebral Palsy: atheloid, ataxic, mixed, and spastic.